mba vs msc

School selection
  • Posted by abhimanyu2903 on 06/25/13 3:33pm

    Sir,i have recently completed my graduation from India.I am interested in pursuing my higher studies from UK. I am confused that wheather i should do msc program or mba program. I in the end has to continue with my family business with is based on pharmaceutical distribution where supply chain is an important concept. For msc i am getting good universities as options but for mba i am getting average universities. But, my main aim would me more of learning rather than a mba/msc degree.I myself had thought of doing mba earlier but my friend who studies in leeds says that mba or msc is same thing the difference is just of the stamp.But also for mba students uk government is providing a visa extend.I am totally confused that i should do a mba program or msc program.Sir, please help me in finding an appropriate course.

    • Posted by Thomas Graf on 06/25/13 3:44pm

      Hi there,

      thank you for your question. I have to disagree with your friend's comment. A Master in Management (MIM) and an MBA are different things although they both offer a general management education and a postgraduate degree. Please have a look at my well-cited and detailed article on the difference between MIM and MBA and let me know if you still have questions afterwards.

      Best wishes
      Thomas

      by Thomas Graf

    • Posted by abhimanyu2903 on 06/27/13 6:48pm

      Sir, thankyou for your response.Sir, i received an unconditional offer letter from leeds metropolitian university i wanted to confirm that is it a good university and they are offering a scholarship of 1500 pounds as well??? Other universities whichi am considering are conventry,wales,cardiff metropolitian,bangor,demout fort for mba program......which one to consider sir??

      • Posted by Thomas Graf on 06/28/13 1:48pm

        Hi there,

        thank you for your question. I understand that assessing business schools and programs is difficult and reliable information seesm to be rare. I recommend, however, following a two-steps approach to find YOUR master (note that the master tha satisfies you may not necessarily be the same master that satisfies your colleagues or friends as they may have different preferences.

        • First, try to assess rather general quality criteria such as accreditations and rankings.
        • Second, try to reflect your own subjective career goals and then screen the schools (by reading their websites for statistics and by contacting the career service teams) for answers. For instance, if your ow goal is to start in an investment bank after graduation and if you find otu that no investment bank recruits at one of your favorite schools... maybe studiyng there is not optimal.

        As forthe accreditations, pleae have a look at our accreditation article first. Then evaluate your selection of schools according to that.

        As for the rankings, I recommend you to evaluate the schools according to the FT Master in Management Ranking as well as according to teh most important MBA Rankings. The higher the school is there, the more renowned likely is its management education.

        As for your personal preferences, clarify your top employers, industries, and job positions or functions - those that you would like to work after graduation. Then screen the schools' websites for statistics on this and contact the career offices. Also include questions such as "How many percentage of your graduates foudn a job within 3 months after graduation?".

        Best wishes
        Thomas

        By Thomas Graf

    • Posted by Abhinav on 07/02/13 3:20am

      Hello thomas,

      Firstly, I am in my final year of bachelor graduation and i have just done an exchange programme in Portugal (ERASMUS) for 6 months. I have had a really nice experience there and I was planning for further studies in Europe.

      Then I looked upon the MIM programme which sounds perfect for me as I have n job experience and I can't do MBA. I want to do MBA , but the thing is I cant really work for 3 years and then study again , it makes a lot of difference. Thus when I read your global mim study and took an opinion from few of my european friends, I found this program really attractive,

      But the problem is I want to do either only mba or only mim, thus I want to know if by only doing mim at a reputed institute , I can open up a good carrer platform, or is it much more advisable to also do an MBA later.
      Also as MIM is relatively unkown in India, I have no idea if I could come back to India and work again.

      Another query is regarding the work permit, is it easy for the Indians to get a work permit there or can u suggest me some tips regarding which country has an easier work permit policy in Europe? Also do the companies offering job sometimes prefer the europeans over non- europeans or is ithe same career oppurunities for non-europeans too?

      • Posted by Thomas Graf on 07/02/13 1:56pm

        Hi there,

        thank you for your question. My key recommendation for you is: Don't play MIM programs against MBA programs. You don't what happens in 3 or 5 years - maybe you eran money then and still want to do an MBA - then maybe you will do an MBA. You don't know what happens in 7 or 9 years. Maybe you still want to do an MBA and decide for a Part-time or Executive MBA.Maybe you have no interest in an MBA in some years.

        I would not think about this too much now. Instead, I recommend you to assess what you need NOW. For example, if you assess your career chances as satisfying for the moment I would apply for a job. If you are not happy with your job chances now, a Master such as the MIM could make sense.

        You will gain knowledge and develop competence. Hence, independent of the reputation of the school and whether your future employer knows the school you will be more qualified and do your job better thank without such an education.

        If you choose the school carefully - such that your favorite employers recruit there - you also gain a network of companies. Finally, if you favorite employer appreciates your school (you can find that out if you ask the HR department of him or his competitors; or by checking who recruits at the campus; or by asking where the graduates start to work), you may gain a reputation advantage.

        As for the work permits, this is very individual from country to country: I recommend asking teh school about it and about its experience with placing people from your country (no experience means... maybe the wrong program...?) and you regional embassy.

        Best wishes
        Thomas

        By Thomas Graf

    • Posted by Abhinav on 07/03/13 1:26pm

      Thanks for the information Thomas. Though I am very much sure of doing the MIM programme in Europe, my only concern is regarding the career prospects in India ( as MIM is relatively unknown) after working a couple of years there. Also, generally for example in the US, they usually pay the indian counterparts lesser for the same job level as an Indian. Does this happen in Europe too?

      Also apart from GMAT , which u said half the schools don't consider , what are the primary requirements to get into these schools? As far as academic excellence, my bachelor grades are above average, but my best shot was to get in by achieving a high GMAT score. What is primarily taken into consideration for admission process?

      • Posted by Thomas Graf on 07/03/13 8:37pm

        Hi there,

        I understand your concerns. Maybe you can contact some of your potential or favorite employers in India and theri HR departments and just ask how they would consider the MIM. Of course that also depends on the institution where you get your degree - so select some of your most favorite schools and contact some firms where you want to work later on.

        As for the requirements, number one is your grade in your undrgraduate studies. Students also need to proove their language skills, e.g. by the TOEFL. Some require the GMAT. Some require a first degree in business or economics or restrict the program to graduates to only a few disciplines. After all of this and depending on the program they may also broadeb their perspective towards what else you have done in your life (internships, extra-curricular activities). Then they may also want to do an interview with you.

        Since the requirements differ, I recommend you to visit the schools' websites and check the admissions pages. Do this for 5 or 6 schols and you'll have a nice impression of what they require.

        Best wishes
        Thomas

        By Thomas Graf