Country of study important?

School selection
  • Posted by jennied on 06/14/11 1:04am

    Hi,

    I'm a Canadian citizen and there are only a few accredited MiM universities in Canada that I'm interested in applying to. So generally speaking, how different are the MiM programs offered in universities outside of Canada (i.e. Europe and USA) compared to the Canadian ones? If I want to work in Canada after obtaining my MiM degree, should I stick to Canadian universities? If I obtained a MiM degree from a non-Canadian university, would that hinder my chances of working in Canada versus if I obtained a Canadian MiM degree?

    So basically, how important is the country/location of study?

    I would highly appreciate any advice :)

    Thanks!

    • Posted by Thomas Graf on 06/14/11 1:24am

      Hi Jennie,

      thank you for your question. There are two ways to find this out:

      1. Ask the employers in Canada
      I would suggest that you pick out 3 of your favorite employers in Canada (or their competitors...) and directly contact their HR departments. Ask them:

      • Do you recruit on campusses outside of Canada?
      • Independently of the campus recruitment - are their universities outside of Canada that you know and appreciate?

      In other words, I would not directly ask them about the MIM but more on their general recruitment culture regarding degrees outside of Canada.

      2. Ask your favorite NON-Canadian Business Schools
      I would suggest to make a list of 5 non-Canadian Business Schools that are interesting for you - for whatever reasons - and contact their admissions department and career service:

      • Do they have experience with Candian students?
      • Do they have experience with graduates who started working in Canada afterwards?

      The first approach (employers) is important to narrow down your question. There won't be one answer for all employers in Canada and you are not interested in every single employer. So, narrowing it down to some of your prospective future employers gives you exactly the answers that you need and that are relevant for you.

      The second approach (non-Canadian business schools) is important as the employers may - for some reason or the other - not give you the whole picture. Maybe the person you talk to doesn't know everything about their own practices. Also you may miss some important employers that you never thought of before. By asking business schools you may approach this issue from their perspective - and you will quickly find out whether your top b-schools can increase or decrease your chances in Canada. Before that, by the way, you can also screen their website and statistics on graduates (where they came from).

      I hope I could help you develop the next steps on your decision-making path.

      Best wishes
      Thomas

      • Posted by Thomas Graf on 06/15/11 12:00pm

        Another idea: Why don't you get in touch with Canadian Business Schools and find out about their partner universities outside of Canada? I am sure some of them have these partnerships.

        (1) If you are insecure about how the Canadian job-market acknowledges non-Canadian Masters, you could enrol in a recognized Canadian school and spend a term of the program abroad at such a partner school.

        (2) You could also contact the non-Canadian partner school of a Canadian school directly and ask them about their experiences with Canadians who do a Master there and go back to Canada after graduation.

        Best wishes
        Thomas